We run crowdsourced, creative campaigns that enlist artist and designers to create work around different ideas and causes. All designs that meet the requirements in their respective creative briefs will be published and made available for sale as prints and other merchandise. Artists retain ownership of their work but grant us permission to promote, license and sell it in exchange for 40% of the proceeds.

1200 Posters was one of Creative Action Network’s first campaigns, originally inviting 12 up-and-coming artists to illustrate 1 of 12 quotes about community, conversation and collaboration from Margaret Wheatley's text "Turning to One Another". Each artist created a poster design that was sold in editions of 100, released every month through 2012. We’ve since opened up the campaign for contributions from anyone!

Your Poster Should:

  • Combine type and image to illustrate one of the twelve quotes by Margaret Wheatley
  • Be a vertically oriented, 16" by 20" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (4800 by 6000 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Be a full bleed image (no margins or borders)
  • Keep a safe area of at least 1" on all sides (don’t place text too close to the edge)

Your Poster Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.

Quotes:

  • There is no power greater than community discovering what it cares about.
  • Ask what's possible, not what's wrong. Keep asking.
  • Notice what you care about. Assume that many others share your dreams.
  • Be brave enough to start a conversation that matters.
  • Talk to people you know. Talk to people you don't know. Talk to people you never talk to.
  • Expect to be surprised.
  • Treasure curiosity more than certainty.
  • Invite everyone who cares to work on what's possible.
  • Know that creative solutions come from new connections.
  • Remember, you don't fear people whose story you know.
  • Real listening always brings people closer together.
  • Trust that meaningful conversations can change the world.
"We The People Of The United States, In Order To Form A More Perfect Union"
- The Constitution Of The United States.

On June 26th, 2015, The Supreme Court ruled in Obergefell v. Hodges in that marriage is a right, for everyone, everywhere. Since our Constitution was written over 200 years ago, Americans have been working to forge our nation into a more perfect union, and with this ruling we've done it again. Congratulations to everyone who's worked so hard and so long to make equality a reality. We're inviting artists and designers to follow suit and create a series of designs celebrating our more perfect union. 

Proceeds from this campaign support Courage Campaign, an online community powered by more than one million members, instrumental in the fight for marriage equality. 

Your Design Should:

  • Typographically illustrate the phrase "A More Perfect Union"
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Use up to 3 colors
  • Be free-standing (ie. design should have a simple background and shouldn’t touch the edge of the frame)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file with a transparent background (PNG or TIFF)

Your Design Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.
  • Be mean spirited or attack those who disagree with you.

The world is bristling with more than 15,000 nuclear weapons - thousands of which are locked and loaded, ready to fire at a moment's notice. The risk that these weapons of mass destruction will be used is rising and the consequences are greater than ever. The only way to prevent a nuclear catastrophe is to secure all nuclear materials and eliminate all nuclear weapons: "global zero."

We're all familiar with the traditional imagery of the anti-nuke movement, much of it developed during the counterculture movements of the 1960s and 70s. Doves, peace signs, sunflowers, mushroom clouds and other cliched images from that period served a valuable purpose then, but they're not working today. It's time for a fresh start. The movement needs a new, forward-looking approach to communicating the urgent truth about the global nuclear threat--and the promise of a world without nuclear weapons--to a new generation of grassroots activists around the world. That's where you come in. 

We've partnered with Global Zero, the international movement for the elimination of all nuclear weapons, to take on this challenge, and build a new collection of designs for the anti-nuke movement. We're inviting artists and designers around the world (especially those from key nuclear-armed states, including China, France, India, Israel, Pakistan, Russia, the United Kingdom and the United States) to contribute designs illustrating the number zero and the goal of a future free of nuclear weapons.

Everything is on the line. Our actions and attitudes today will determine whether we usher in a future free from nuclear weapons--or one in which they are used again, to devastating and irreparable effect. Proceeds from this campaign support Global Zero, the international movement for the elimination of nuclear weapons. 

Your Design Should:

  • Typographically illustrate the number or word zero and evoke the global grassroots movement working towards a future free of nuclear weapons
  • Include one of the following slogans: Global Zero, Demand Zero, We Stop at Zero, A World Without Nuclear Weapons, Vote Zero
  • Be urgent, bold, nonpartisan, forward-looking, positive
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Use up to 3 colors
  • Be free-standing (ie. design should have a simple background and shouldn’t touch the edge of the frame)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file with a transparent background (PNG or TIFF)

Your Design Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.
  • Include negative or cliched 60s imagery like mushroom clouds, peace signs, sunflowers or doves
  • Read as the letter "O" (as opposed to the number)
The recent tragedy in Newtown, CT has brought national attention to the issue of gun control: what types of weapons are available, how they end up in the wrong hands, and how to prevent future tragedies from occurring. The list seems to be growing faster now: Columbine, Fort Hood, Tucson, Aurora, Oak Creek and now Newtown. It's time for us to step up and do our part. The NRA and those who defend the status quo are hyper-organized with newsletter, conferences, and even posters. It's up to us to exceed their efforts and show that we're serious about reducing gun violence in America.

We're launching a collection of gun control posters with posters from artists of all skill sets and backgrounds. We're hoping that the collection is as diverse and expressive as the artists we're reaching out to but would also ask that the following guidelines be observed.

For every poster sold you will receive 40% of all revenue. The remaining 60% will be split between the Creative Action Network and our campaign partner organizations.
If you have any questions or need feedback on your work, please email us at contribute@thecreativeactionnetwork.com.

Your poster should:
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Simple, clear, and concise with a single takeaway, message or idea (ie. "Assault weapons are bad" or "We need fewer guns, not more")
  • Be generally positive, uplifting and encouraging action (ie. "Now's the time for action!" and "Together we can reduce gun violence")
Your poster should not:
  • Be gory, violent, or depressing
  • Be too specific (ie. "Pass this bill" or "Vote for this legislator")
  • Be disrespectful
  • Have a logo in the bottom right corner
Wolves get a bad rap. Though they are a critical linchpin that help maintain healthy ecosystems, in popular culture, they're often portrayed as scheming predators and menaces which, in turn, makes their protection as an endangered species a harder sell. Some lawmakers now are trying to take away Federal protections from wolves, playing upon those paranoid ideations. We are trying to stop that from happening.

Creative Action Network and Earthjustice are inviting artists and designers to build a collection of designs with the goal of celebrating the wolf by portraying its wildness, mystery, and general bad-assness but in a playful way, relying on irony and kitsch (for lack of a better word) to improve their public image. We wish to combat fear and misunderstanding of wolves by celebrating the species and building a greater appreciation for the iconic creatures.

Proceeds from this campaign support Earthjustice, using the power of law to defend our right to a healthy environment. 

Your Design Should:

  • Depict a wolf/wolves and play on one of the following themes: The wolf = the epitome of the wild and everything that wilderness stands for. The strength of the pack/join the pack/a chorus of howls/Stand with wolves. Wolves as sexy beasts. The subject of the fairy tale flipped on its head. i.e. The Big, Bad Wolf as the misunderstood anti-hero.
  • Be some level of kitschy (considered to be in poor taste because of excessive garishness or sentimentality, but sometimes appreciated in an ironic or knowing way.)
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Use up to 3 colors
  • Be free-standing (ie. design should have a simple background and shouldn’t touch the edge of the frame)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file that is layered or includes a transparent background (AI, PSD, PNG, TIFF) (Be sure to outline any fonts used)

Your Design Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.
  • Depict wolves as monstrous or fearsome
Contribute a design addressing an issue that moves you. Whether that's on health care, immigration, marriage equality, war and peace or drug policy, the specific topics are open. We want to hear what's keeping you up at night, what moves you to action and how we collectively move forward in America and the world. We just ask the content is compelling and the design is beautifully executed.

Power to the Poster is a part of The Creative Action Network. Justin Kemerling and Aaron Perry-Zucker are its curators.

Your Poster Should:

  • Advocate for progressive change and inspire people to action.
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 18" RGB image at 300dpi (3600 by 5400 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG

Your Poster Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.
  • Be poorly designed, rely on cliches, be overtly negative or advocate for violence or vulgarity.

Every great book deserves a great cover. Sadly, many of the greatest classics in the public domain are left with poorly designed or autogenerated covers that fail to capture what makes these books exciting and inspiring to us. We're asking illustrators, typographers, and designers of all stripes to create new covers starting with 100 of the greatest works of fiction in the public domain. Together we can help to keep these classics fresh, modern, and accessible to new generations of readers.

Thanks to a new partnership with the White House, New York Public Library, and the Digital Public Library of America, select Recovering The Classics covers are made available on ebooks for schools and libraries across the country.

Your Cover Should:

  • Depict the front cover of one of the listed titles, prominently displaying the book’s title (larger) and the author’s full name.
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 18" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (3600 by 5400 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Be bold, expressive, and engaging
  • Be legible in black and white
  • Be a full bleed image (no margins or borders)
  • Keep a safe area of at least 1" on all sides (don’t place text too close to the edge)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file that is layered or includes a transparent background (AI, PSD, PNG, TIFF) (Be sure to outline any fonts used)

Your Cover Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.
  • Rely overly on cliches

Book List:

A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
A Little Princess by Frances Hodgson Burnett
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man by James Joyce
A Room with a View by E. M. Forster
A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain
Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll
Andersen's Fairy Tales by Hans Christian Andersen
Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
Around the World in 80 Days by Jules Verne
Babbitt by Sinclair Lewis
Bleak House by Charles Dickens
Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoevsky
Cyrano de Bergerac by Edmond Rostand
David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
Dead Souls by Nikolai Gogol
Don Quixote by Miguel de Cervantes
Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson
Dracula by Bram Stoker
Dubliners by James Joyce
Far From the Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy
Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions by Edwin A. Abbott
Frankenstein by Mary Shelley
Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Grimm's Fairy Tales by Brothers Grimm
Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift
Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad
Heidi by Johanna Spyri
Howards End by E. M. Forster
Inferno by Dante Alighieri
Jacob's Room by Virginia Woolf
Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne
Jude the Obscure by Thomas Hardy
Kim by Rudyard Kipling
King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table by Author Unknown
King Solomon's Mines by H. Rider Haggard
Leaves of Grass by Walt Whitman
Les Miserables by Victor Hugo
Little Lord Fauntleroy by Frances Hodgson Burnett
Little Men by Louisa May Alcott
Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
Madame Bovary by Gustave Flaubert
Middlemarch, A Study of Provincial Life by George Eliot
Moby-Dick by Herman Melville
Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave by Frederick Douglass
Oliver Twist, or the Parish Boy's Progress by Charles Dickens
On the Origin of Species by Charles Darwin
Paradise Lost by John Milton
Persuasion by Jane Austen
Peter Pan by J. M. Barrie
Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe
Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
Siddhartha by Hermann Hesse
Swann's Way by Marcel Proust
Tales of the Jazz Age by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Tess of the D'Urbervilles: A Pure Woman Faithfully Presented by Thomas Hardy
The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes by Arthur Conan Doyle
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
The Arabian Nights: Tales from a Thousand and One Nights by Unknown
The Art of War by Sun Tzu
The Awakening by Kate Chopin
The Brothers Karamazov by Fyodor Dostoevsky
The Call of the Wild by Jack London
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels
The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas
The Federalist by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, John Jay
The Good Soldier: A Tale of Passion by Ford Madox Ford
The House of the Seven Gables by Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Hunchback of Notre Dame by Victor Hugo
The Idiot by Fyodor Dostoyevsky
The Invisible Man by H.G. Wells
The Jungle by Upton Sinclair
The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling
The Lady with the Dog and Other Stories by Anton Chekhov
The Last of the Mohicans by James Fenimore Cooper
The Legend of Sleep Hollow by Washington Irving
The Lost Continent by Edgar Rice Burroughs
The Man in the Iron Mask by Alexandre Dumas
The Merry Adventures of Robin Hood by Howard Pyle
The Metamorphosis by Franz Kafka
The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux
The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens
The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett
The Swiss Family Robinson by Johann David Wyss
The Three Musketeers by Alexandre Dumas
The Time Machine by H. G. Wells
The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells
The Wind in the Willows by Kenneth Grahame
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum
The Works of Edgar Allan Poe by Edgar Allan Poe
This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald
Through the Looking-Glass by Lewis Carroll
Thus Spake Zarathustra: A Book for All and None by Frederich Nietzsche
Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman by Laurence Sterne
Twelve Years a Slave by Solomon Northup
Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
Ulysses by James Joyce
Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe
War and Peace by Leo Tolstoy
Winesburg Ohio by Sherwood Anderson
Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
"There is nothing so American as our national parks. The scenery and wild life are native. The fundamental idea behind the parks is native. It is, in brief, that the country belongs to the people...The parks stand as the outward symbol of this great human principle." -Franklin Roosevelt

In the 1930's, as part of the New Deal efforts to put artists to work, our government commissioned posters to showcase the country's most stunning natural features under the banner: "See America." These iconic images put thousands of artists to work, helped link our natural landscape with our American identity, and live on nearly 100 years later as celebrated works of art. But there are hundreds more parks deserving of beautiful artwork to bring the great outdoors and our country's history to a new generation. That's why we're launching a crowdsourced campaign seeking new "See America" posters highlighting the beauty of our natural landscape and historic sites in all 50 states.

Contribute a design depicting your favorite park or natural landmark, the list below should get you started but is only a jumping off point - any landmark, monument or preserved area on the local, state, or federal level are acceptable! "See America" is a project of The Creative Action Network, in partnership with the National Parks Conservation Association, and Posters For The People. Exhibitions are being planned across the country. 

Proceeds from this campaign support National Parks Conservation Association, the independent, nonpartisan voice working to strengthen and protect our nation’s natural, historical, and cultural heritage. 

Your Design Should:

  • Illustrate a treasured space (ie. local, state and federal parks, landmarks, trails, etc.) in the 50 states and US Territories
  • Prominently say "See America"
  • Less prominently include the name of the illustrated park or landmark
  • Take inspiration from, but not be limited by the original See America posters
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Be full bleed (no margins or borders)
  • Keep a safe area of at least 1" on all sides (do not place text too close to the edge)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file that is layered or includes a transparent background (AI, PSD, PNG, TIFF) (Be sure to outline any fonts used)

Your Design Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.

Locations

  • Sample List of Parks and Monuments by State
  • Parks-in-Progress, locations whose conservation status is still being fought for

Since the space race began, generations of Americans have been captivated by the idea of outer space. Science fiction fantasies have filled the pop-culture long before space travel was feasible. With a new era dawning for NASA and privatized space companies our imaginations are again becoming flooded with new images of exploration.

At the start of the manned space age all astronauts were pilots from a military background and they brought the tradition of military shoulder patches with them to the space program. Since then it has become tradition for every mission to have an official patch design.

With a historic milestones being reached everyday there has never been a better time to celebrate the history and future of space travel. We're inviting artists and designers to create a new collection of mission patch designs for your favorite past, present and future missions to help engage a mainstream audience in the excitement of extending humanity’s reach beyond Earth.

A partnership with SpaceHorizons, an innovative non profit that promotes interest in STEM education for minority and female students in underserved communities.

Your Design Should:

  • Illustrate any single past, present or future mission by any Government or Space Agency (see list below below)
  • Prominently include the mission name
  • Less prominently include any notable information like Destination, Date(s), Organizations (Optional)
  • Be a shape with 0-10 sides (circle to decagon) on a solid color background
  • Be a square 18" by 18" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (5400 by 5400 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Use up to 4 colors
  • Work well small (down to 3”, patch size)
  • Include at least 2" of safe space from the edge of the canvas.
  • Optional: Include an apparel file that is layered or includes a transparent background (AI, PSD, PNG, TIFF) (Be sure to outline any fonts used)

Your Design Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos of Space agencies (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Include the names of Astronauts
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.

Click here to view the Sample Mission List

There are men and women, movements, and moments which transcend any one team or sport or era. That's why we've partnered with Bleacher Report, the leading digital destination for team-specific sports content and real-time event coverage, to invite artists from around the world to create work that captures a figure, event or evolution that hold power and meaning far beyond any scoreboard.

Some moments are simple and iconic, while others are a complex series of events, but they all had effects that reverberated beyond the game and shaped society in some way. The goal is to both represent the actual events that took place while using illustrative elements (color, style, composition, etc) to amplify the transcendent nature of the moment.

Proceeds from this campaign support Boys & Girls Clubs, promoting and enhancing the development of boys and girls by instilling a sense of competence, usefulness, belonging and influence. 

Your Poster Should:

  • Illustrate one of the moments listed below
  • Use bold colors and illustrative style to amplify the transcendent nature of the moment
  • Use relevant, typographic quotes to contextualize a moment if you choose (not required).
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Be full bleed (no margins or borders)
  • Keep a safe area of at least 1" on all sides (do not place text too close to the edge)

Your Poster Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.
  • Be based solely off someone else's photograph. If you do use a photograph as your launching off point, it must be available under a creative commons license. It is ok to depict these famous moments and people on your own, inspired by the events.

List of Moments:

  • The Battle of the Sexes II, Houston, Sept. 20, 1973
  • I Can’t Breathe, 2014
  • Munich Massacre, Munich, 1972
  • Pat Tillman, Army Ranger
  • Muhammad Ali and the Draft
  • Title IX and the women’s sports revolution
  • Boston Marathon, April 15, 2013
  • Miracle on Ice, Lake Placid, Feb. 22, 1980
  • Out of the Shadows: Jason Collins, NBA; Brittney Griner, WNBA; Michael Sam, NFL
  • Nelson Mandela, Rugby World Cup, 1995
  • O.J. and the White Bronco, Los Angeles, June 17, 1994
  • Jim Valvano, Madison Square Garden, March 4, 1993
  • Dale Earnhardt, The Man in Black or “The Intimidator”
  • Black Power Salute, Mexico City, Oct. 16, 1968
  • Jackie Robinson, Brooklyn, April 15, 1947
  • Gehrig’s Farewell, Yankee Stadium, July 4, 1939
  • Althea Gibson and Arthur Ashe, tennis pioneers
  • Jesse Owens, Berlin, August 1936
  • Magic Johnson, Los Angeles,  November 7, 1991
  • Texas Western, NCAA basketball, 1966

Libraries are a fundamental part of our communities. They continue to grow, change, and serve in the 21st century. Today's library users understand that the institution is more than just a building and books, and that learning and access are still the cornerstone of modern libraries. Depending on where you live, your library may be funded directly by voters or by your town/city/county government. But regardless of where you live, the vast majority of your library's funding comes from your neighborhood.

A large majority of Americans see libraries as important in their communities. But if they are not currently a library user, they are largely nostalgic about what happens in libraries. It's up to us to update that nostalgia and demonstrate that well-funded libraries impact education, local business development, community identity, and personal discovery in new ways. Libraries are progressive institutions because they are funded by taxes for the common good. They are uniquely conservation institutions because they are cultural heritage institutions that preserve and curate our community identity. Since the beginning of our country, libraries are an integral part in the life of towns and cities. With your support, will continue to do so.

Proceeds from this campaign support EveryLibrary, the first and only national organization dedicated exclusively to political action at a local level to create, renew, and protect public funding for libraries of all types. 

Your Design Should:

  • Prominently say "Vote Libraries" and represent one of the themes below
  • Be simple, illustrative and forward-thinking
  • Be a square 22" by 22" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (6600 by 6600 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Use up to 3 colors
  • Be full bleed (no margins or borders)
  • Keep a safe area of at least 1" on all sides (do not place text too close to the edge)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file that is layered or includes a transparent background (AI, PSD, PNG, TIFF) (Be sure to outline any fonts used)

Your Poster Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.
Your contribution to Vote Libraries should be a call-to-action about the future of this most basic public institution, highlighting one of the following themes:
  1. Education
    1. Story time is early childhood literacy.
    2. Summer reading helps keep kids at grade level, after school time extends the curriculum.
    3. Adult Literacy programs and language development.
  2. Maker Spaces
    1. 3D Printing, creating, and making.
  3. Business Development
    1. Information and Programs for entrepreneurs and small businesses.
    2. Jobs skills training.
  4. Access
    1. Access to tech fuels economic development and connects people to idea, to families and each other.
    2. Access to ideas and information is a basic need for our democracy.

From degraded soils and fracked farmlands to dammed rivers, poisoned water and a rapidly changing climate, our planet is under immediate and increasing threat. This November, you can help defend our planet by voting for leaders who support clean air, clean water, strong climate action, and a shift to regenerative agriculture and a more sustainable economy. The choices we make on Election Day will have a direct effect on countless environmental issues at the national, state and local levels. A vote for the planet is a vote for the future—and the time to act is now.

Patagonia and the Creative Action Network aim to create a new activist collection of political protest posters to communicate Patagonia’s belief that our country’s economy, security and future are wholly dependent on a healthy environment and urging all of us to take action and vote to protect our planet. Born out of The Canary Project, CAN, and Patagonia’s Vote The Environment campaign in 2014, Vote Our Planet is inviting artists & designers across the country to use their talents for our planet.

Patagonia will use this art to remind Americans that voting for our planet is the best defense for America itself: its Air, Water and Soil. A selection of Vote Our Planet art will also be exhibited at the David Brower Center in Berkley, CA as organized by longtime Creative Action Network partner The Canary Project.

Your design should: 

  • Prominently include the text “Vote Our Planet”
  • Use simple imagery to evoke protection and defense of Air, Water, Soil…or all three!
  • Look and feel like a handmade, environmental activist protest poster that is simple, direct and urgent. (Checkout a few of these stylistic examples for inspiration!)
  • Be super simple, no more than 3 colors
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 18" RGB image at 300dpi (3600 by 5400 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Be free-standing (ie. design should have a simple background and shouldn’t touch the edge of the frame)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file with a transparent background (PNG or TIFF)

Your design should not:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.

"Do not oppress a stranger; you yourselves know how it feels to be strangers, because you were strangers in Egypt.” Exodus 23:9

At Passover, Jews all over the world are re-telling the story of their Exodus from Egypt. Unfortunately that story remains all too relevant today, as the world faces the worst refugee crisis since World War II. Approximately 60 million refugees from war and persecution around the world are seeking safety and a better life, just as many of our ancestors did. As states and countries move to pass legislation to keep refugees out, it’s more important than ever that we not lose sight of our compassion and humanity.

That’s why Creative Action Network and the Anti-Defamation League are teaming up to invite artists to illustrate refugee stories from across time and geography. Maybe your family fled pogroms in Eastern Europe, from Nazism, from political oppression in Iran or the Soviet Union. Maybe you know someone who fled Uganda or other countries that persecute members of the LGBT community, fearful that their sexual orientation or gender identity would put them in grave danger. Maybe you are concerned about how many today have to flee extreme violence and persecution, whether from Syria, Iraq, Afghanistan, Nigeria, Central America or some other land. No matter where refugees came from or their reason for fleeing, each story is unique--but connected. We hope to build a collection of pieces that rise above the noise and hateful rhetoric by humanizing the refugee experience.

Like these stunning photographs of Ellis Island Immigrants or these portraits of Syrian Refugees, we’re inviting artists to illustrate portraits depicting a refugee’s exodus. Each piece should depict a pivotal moment in the story of a refugee’s life--whether a family member, someone you know whose personal story has inspired you, or one of the incredible stories found on the UN’s Refugee Story Project (not the only source for powerful refugee stories, but a good one!). The entire collection will show how diverse and universal the refugee experience truly is.

Your design should: 

  • Depict a pivotal moment in the story of a refugee’s exodus. If you don't know a refugee, checkout UNHCR Refugee Stories, the US Holocaust MuseumDoctors without Borders, HIAS, or Women on the Run for inspiration.
  • Include the text “We Were Strangers Too”
  • Provide as much context as to the time place and if possible, reason for their flight.
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG

Your design should not:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.

The iconic “We Can Do It” poster of the 1940's is one of the most famous posters of the last 100 years, depicting an empowered female worker. Initially commissioned by Westinghouse Electric to motivate its own workers, the poster was claimed by the feminist movement in the 1980’s to represent the idea of women entering the workforce. The iconic image remained in the zeitgeist and the message of equality and worker empowerment is still quite relevant today.

With issues like equal pay for women and the fight for a $15 minimum wage playing a prominent role in the current National discussion, we’re excited to announce an exciting opportunity to create a new series of Rosie-the-Riveter-inspired designs that depict and celebrate modern-day workers (women and men alike) who keep the country running and rarely receive the recognition they deserve. Today’s workforce is more diverse than ever, so from migrant farm workers to female bus drivers, fast food to healthcare workers, we’re seeking designs that depict and celebrate these hard-working Americans.

Your Design Should:  

  • Recognize and depict an under-appreciated worker in an empowered light
  • Take inspiration from Rosie the Riveter
  • Prominently include the text “We Can Do It!”
  • Less prominently include the name of the type of worker depicted
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Keep a safe area of at least 1" on all sides (don’t place text too close to the edge)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file that is layered or includes a transparent background (AI, PSD, PNG, TIFF) (Be sure to outline any fonts used)

Your Design Should Not:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.

Sample Worker :

  • Migrant Farmworkers
  • Domestic Workers (nanny, house cleaners, etc)
  • Healthcare Workers (nurses, techs, etc)
  • Fast Food Workers
  • Municipal Workers (bus drivers, waste management, etc)
  • Professional Workers (doctors, lawyers, etc)
  • And many more!
Working Families Party is a grassroots progressive political organization that fights for economic and racial justice. They are fighting for an economy that works for everyone, not just the wealthy and well connected, and a democracy in which every voice matters. They also believe the promise of our democracy has been broken when the views of a single wealthy donor can carry more weight that the needs of millions of hard-working families.

Working Families Party (WFP) and Creative Action Network (CAN) have teamed up to create a series of designs celebrating five of WFP's core issues. As WFP grows state by state, becoming a leading national player in the fights that matter to working families, we're helping them visualize their core causes to mobilize their community.

The collection of designs will be used as prints, postcards, t-shirts and other campaign materials for WFP members and should proudly and boldly illustrate one of the slogans below. Solutions should incorporate illustrative or graphic elements alongside typography to further communicate the issue.

Proceeds from this campaign support Working Families Party, electing the next generation of progressive leaders and building grassroots power to renew the American Dream. 

Your Design Should:

  • Typographically illustrate the chosen slogan (below) along with illustrative and/or graphic elements.
  • Be bold, simple, and clear
  • Be a vertically oriented, 12" by 16" RGB image at a resolution of 300dpi (3600 by 4800 pixels) that is a JPG or PNG
  • Be free-standing (ie. design should have a simple background and shouldn’t touch the edge of the frame)
  • Optional: Include an apparel file that is layered or includes a transparent background (AI, PSD, PNG, TIFF) (Be sure to outline any fonts used)

Your Design Shouldn’t:

  • Include urls or logos (small artist signatures are fine)
  • Use copyrighted images or images that don't belong to you. All images you use should be your own, or available under a creative commons or other similar license.